Reading ‘Lincoln in the Bardo’ by George Saunders the Second Time

I had read Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders overcome by the hubbub of it winning the Booker Prize in 2017. Back then, I felt sour about spending a hefty amount over a book that wasn’t historical fiction in the true sense though it promised to be about Abraham Lincoln and his deceased son.… Continue reading Reading ‘Lincoln in the Bardo’ by George Saunders the Second Time

7 Popular Romance Tropes that I Enjoy Reading

My last blog post ‘Happy Endings | Short Story by Margaret Atwood’ kept me nudging on the notion of ‘happily ever after’. So, I thought of writing about my favourite romance tropes. Love stories are a staple for everyone, but some stories touch our hearts more than others. For instance, I cannot stand the love… Continue reading 7 Popular Romance Tropes that I Enjoy Reading

Happy Endings | Short Story by Margaret Atwood

A writer’s job isn’t easy. Ordinary lives are mundane without the pizzazz of a thriller/ romance/ tragedy/ horror and unforeseeable twists and turns. The usual life story is about ticking the boxes on birth, education, profession, marriage, children, and retirement. Are we interested in this story? Perhaps yes, if there is an interesting spin to… Continue reading Happy Endings | Short Story by Margaret Atwood

Six Novellas to Read before the Year Ends

Last quarter of the year! And for those of you who are sweating like me with the fear of not achieving the set reading goals, I have an idea. Whatever your goal was, let’s tweak those TBRs and replace the full-length hefty novels with some lifesaver Novellas at this point. Fewer pages to read, pacey… Continue reading Six Novellas to Read before the Year Ends

Embrace Your Inner Child With ‘The Little Prince’ by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

I think I lived under a Baobab tree to keep pushing aside ‘The Little Prince’ by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, reasoning over its melancholic undertone. Though ironically it is a Children’s book. ‘The Little Prince’ reads like a parable. There is fantasy and realism that declutters many of our modern-day self-delusions. ‘The Little Prince’ begins with… Continue reading Embrace Your Inner Child With ‘The Little Prince’ by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Albom | Book Review

I came to ‘Tuesdays with Morrie’ by Mitch Albom when I was searching for a book with deeper philosophical connotations. This autobiographical book based on Mitch Albom’s visits to his terminally ill Professor has been popular in the self-help genre since its publication in 1997. But I was yet to read! On the cover, just… Continue reading Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Albom | Book Review

The Best Books that I have Read but Don’t have on My Bookshelf

To own a book is one of the greatest treasures. All through our lives, we collect books and display them on our bookshelves as prized possessions. But the other day, I realized I don’t own some of the best reads of my life. Atrocious, yes, but then such is reality. I am sure you too… Continue reading The Best Books that I have Read but Don’t have on My Bookshelf

The Sun is Also A Star by Nicola Yoon | Book Review

‘The Sun is Also a Star’ by Nicole Yoon is a heartwarming, idyllic, and fairytale-ish read. In my opinion, this book is a delightful amalgamation of YA meets immigrant and romance themes. The story begins the day Natasha Kingsley, the 16-year-old good-looking, head turner Jamaican-American is set to be deported from America to her home… Continue reading The Sun is Also A Star by Nicola Yoon | Book Review

How did I fare? Eight Months of the Reading Challenge 2021 #TBRChallenge

Reading challenges are the best way to stay disciplined in a reading routine. I signed up to read 30 books for the Blogchatter #TBRChallenge this year. This post is my check-in on what has been the progress so far. My 2020 in Books In 2020, the pandemic hit us in the month of March and… Continue reading How did I fare? Eight Months of the Reading Challenge 2021 #TBRChallenge

China Room by Sunjeev Sahota: Book Review

China Room by Sunjeev Sahota, Penguin Random House India, 243 pages China Room: An intuitive story on patriarchy, love, and despair intertwined with alienation, isolation, and addiction of a young immigrant. Deservedly, Longlisted for the 2021 Booker Prize. ‘China Room’ by Sunjeev Sahota is an intrinsically Indian story; it takes you back in time to… Continue reading China Room by Sunjeev Sahota: Book Review

Ten Books on Friendship to Read and Cherish

What is friendship if not the camaraderie between Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn? Yes, the first example on friendship that comes to my mind is from Mark Twain’s book. Every book we read etches its mark on us with its characters…some of these characters and their relationship with others strike an emotional chord with us… Continue reading Ten Books on Friendship to Read and Cherish

My Bookish Bucket List

Bucket list! I remember how swiftly our lives were inundated with this catchphrase. In the earlier, more simpler times, we had a wish list and there was no pressure to check off each box on the itinerary. Now almost everyone has a ‘bucket list’. Bucket list has turned into a serious deal because kicking the… Continue reading My Bookish Bucket List

Dilemmas of a Book Blogger

This week’s writing prompt says, ‘Describe a time when you faced a dilemma and how did you deal with it?’ I started blogging a couple of years ago and now, out there is my book blog established with a niche audience. But when I introduce myself as a book blogger, I feel a certain dilemma… Continue reading Dilemmas of a Book Blogger

The Teachings of Bhagavad Gita: Timeless Wisdom for the Modern Age by Richa Tilokani | Book Review

The Teaching of Bhagavad Gita by Richa Tilokani, Hay House, 226 pages ‘Bhagavad Gita’ is the epitome of knowledge, a philosophical discourse leading one onto the path of spiritual awakening. ‘The Teachings of Bhagavad Gita: Timeless Wisdom for the Modern Age’ by Richa Tilokani presents a simple, contemporized, and easy-to-understand interpretation of ‘Bhagavad Gita’. In… Continue reading The Teachings of Bhagavad Gita: Timeless Wisdom for the Modern Age by Richa Tilokani | Book Review

Small and Simple Pleasures in Life to Cherish Everyday

Simple and mundane. Whoever said that…Life’s greatest joys have always been in the simplest things. The pandemic, for sure, made us take note of the little things in our everyday lives and reiterated the importance of small and simple pleasures in our lives. We had all the time, decluttered from the taxing hours spent on… Continue reading Small and Simple Pleasures in Life to Cherish Everyday

Half of a Yellow Sun by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie: Book Review

I heard Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s ‘The Danger of a Single Story’ Ted Talk a couple of years back. It made me think about the political and media influence on structuring a story that leads to a one-sided prejudiced opinion in our minds. “I am Nigerian because a white man created Nigeria and gave me that… Continue reading Half of a Yellow Sun by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie: Book Review

What’s On My Desk?

Imagine a sloth on a tree. I believe this is how I picture me with my work desk. My work desk is the center of my work-from-home universe. As a book blogger, this is where I read emails for reviews and promotions, catalogue the requests, and schedule the work. This post is about my precious… Continue reading What’s On My Desk?

Is ‘Wind in the Willows’ by Kenneth Grahame interesting to read as an adult?

I opened ‘The Wind in the Willows’ by Kenneth Grahame with the expectation of reading an idyllic children’s book. Perhaps I was being a bit too literal in my headspace. ‘The Wind in the Willows’ indeed has more appeal for an adult mind than a child’s, the one that has seen the realities of life. … Continue reading Is ‘Wind in the Willows’ by Kenneth Grahame interesting to read as an adult?

The Tenant of Wildfell Hall by Anne Bronte: Summary and Analysis

“But romantic notions will not do: I want her to have true notions.” Anne Bronte did not follow a romantic style of writing in her two novels, unlike Charlotte Bronte and Emily Bronte. Anne Bronte opted for realism. Anne Bronte was an extremely brave writer to depict alcoholism and adultery without window dressing it. ‘The… Continue reading The Tenant of Wildfell Hall by Anne Bronte: Summary and Analysis

The Sense of an Ending by Julian Barnes | Book Review

I read ‘The Sense of an Ending’ by Julian Barnes soon after it had won the Man Booker Prize in 2011. Once I received the book, the most striking part was its minimal cover design. Though I was clueless on what to expect from a book that merely ran into 150 pages!  Least to say,… Continue reading The Sense of an Ending by Julian Barnes | Book Review