Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier

‘Rebecca’ by Daphne du Maurier is exceptional, so much so that when you reach the last line, you will go back to the first chapter to see the magic unravel!  Undoubtedly, ‘Rebecca’ has a ghost-like undertone to it, yet it is so real that you marvel at Daphne du Maurier’s story-telling technique. (The last story … Continue reading Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier

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Embrace Your Inner Child With ‘The Little Prince’ by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

I think I lived under a Baobab tree to keep pushing aside ‘The Little Prince’ by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, reasoning over its melancholic undertone. Though ironically it is a Children’s book. ‘The Little Prince’ reads like a parable. There is fantasy and realism that declutters many of our modern-day self-delusions. ‘The Little Prince’ begins with … Continue reading Embrace Your Inner Child With ‘The Little Prince’ by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

Is ‘Wind in the Willows’ by Kenneth Grahame interesting to read as an adult?

I opened ‘The Wind in the Willows’ by Kenneth Grahame with the expectation of reading an idyllic children’s book. Perhaps I was being a bit too literal in my headspace. ‘The Wind in the Willows’ indeed has more appeal for an adult mind than a child’s, the one that has seen the realities of life.  … Continue reading Is ‘Wind in the Willows’ by Kenneth Grahame interesting to read as an adult?

The Bronte Sisters | On their writing and books

Charlotte Bronte wrote in ‘Jane Eyre’, “I am no bird; and no net ensnares me: I am a free human being with an independent will.” The Bronte sisters had a unique point of view on class and gender. These three sisters shaped their writings based on their life experiences and created one of the most … Continue reading The Bronte Sisters | On their writing and books

Little Women by Louisa May Alcott | Book Review

I'd been procrastinating way too much on this one, that is until I saw the movie trailer of ‘Little Women’, the onscreen adaptation by Greta Gerwig! Instantly, I jumped in, read the book, saw the movie, and loved both! Coming to the book, ‘Little Women’ is like a fable for adult readers. The story follows … Continue reading Little Women by Louisa May Alcott | Book Review

The Penelopiad and Circe: Two Retellings of Homer’s ‘The Odyssey’

‘The Penelopiad’ by Margaret Atwood and ‘Circe’ by Madeline Miller changed the narrative set by Homer’s ‘The Odyssey’ ‘Sing to me of the man, Muse, the man of twists and turns driven time and again off course, once he had plundered the hallowed heights of Troy.’ – The Odyssey by Homer ‘The Odyssey’ by Homer … Continue reading The Penelopiad and Circe: Two Retellings of Homer’s ‘The Odyssey’

Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell | Book Recommendation

“Food! Food! Why did the stomach have a longer memory than the mind?” War isn’t poetic or romantic, not even in literature. ‘Gone With the Wind’ by Margaret Mitchell makes such a compelling read in its realistic portrayal of the American Civil War period. ‘Gone With the Wind’ had been on my TBR for a … Continue reading Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell | Book Recommendation

Three of My Favourite Agatha Christie Books

Reading ‘Agatha Christie’ makes one nostalgic. I wonder how an old-fashioned crime investigation can hold its charm for a 100-years now! Agatha Christie published her first book, ‘The Mysterious Affair at Styles’ in 1920 and introduced Hercule Poirot, the detective who appeared in thirty-three of her sixty-six detective novels. Sherlock Holmes (created by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle) … Continue reading Three of My Favourite Agatha Christie Books

The Enchanted April by Elizabeth Von Arnim | To Those Who Appreciate Wisteria and Sunshine

“I daresay when we finally reach heaven – the one they talk about so much – we shan’t find it a bit more beautiful.” Enchanted is the word! Yes, while reading ‘The Enchanted April’ by Elizabeth Von Arnim published in 1922, I was in San Salvatore, vicariously living in a castle and basking in the … Continue reading The Enchanted April by Elizabeth Von Arnim | To Those Who Appreciate Wisteria and Sunshine

The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood | Book Review

Dystopia in ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ is way harder to read than the one in ‘1984’ by George Orwell because as a female reader, the thrust of ‘dystopia’ cascades over to the women in this book. Frankly, ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ haunts you like no other horror. I kept asking myself after every chapter, if this was … Continue reading The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood | Book Review

The Unbearable Lightness of Being by Milan Kundera: Soul versus Body or Art versus Kitsch

I had scribbled a few lines from ‘The Unbearable Lightness of Being’ onto my journal…this was fifteen years back! About a year ago, in one of the book club meetings, a young college girl asked me if I read this book. My answer being ‘No’, there was an honest enthusiastic recommendation from her end. And, … Continue reading The Unbearable Lightness of Being by Milan Kundera: Soul versus Body or Art versus Kitsch

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte: A Classic with an astounding female protagonist

In 1847, Charlotte Bronte published ‘Jane Eyre’ under the pseudonym of Currer Bell. Clearly, this was not the era of female writers but Bronte sisters brought strong female characters outside the purview of matrimony into the literary scenario. In ‘Jane Eyre’, Bronte told the story of a young spirited girl, her hardships, social isolation, and … Continue reading Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte: A Classic with an astounding female protagonist

Agnes Grey by Anne Bronte | Book Review

Reading ‘Agnes Grey’ brought with it the memories of reading ‘Jane Eyre’. And, it is an irony that ‘Agnes Grey’ was written a year before ‘Jane Eyre’; though published around the same time in the year 1847, the latter became a more popular Classic. Perhaps the Cinderella twist in ‘Jane Eyre’, Mr.Rochester riding on a … Continue reading Agnes Grey by Anne Bronte | Book Review

Burmese Days by George Orwell: Book Review

‘Burmese Days’ by George Orwell is a window into the lives of the British Officials serving in Burma under the British occupation of the Indian sub-continent. Orwell could draw a lot from the five-years he spent as a police officer in the Indian Imperial Police force in Burma. Katha on the west side of the … Continue reading Burmese Days by George Orwell: Book Review

Hard Times by Charles Dickens: If ‘Facts Alone Are Wanted in Life…’?

‘Hard Times’ was a satirical take on the existing educational system and the impact of growing industrialization. It is an irony, indeed, that our modern world continues to adhere to the notions criticized by Charles Dickens through his book in 1854. Like in every Dickensian realm, in this book too, the characters are divided into … Continue reading Hard Times by Charles Dickens: If ‘Facts Alone Are Wanted in Life…’?

A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens | The Classic Christmas time read

Every Christmas, I would regret not having read ‘A Christmas Carol’ by Charles Dickens as yet. Yes, one of those books that is always on the Classics TBR but gets skipped for some bestseller. Also, I kept saving ‘A Christmas Carol’ for the perfect Christmas time reading list. ‘It is Dickens’ was another reason to … Continue reading A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens | The Classic Christmas time read

Nineteen Eighty-Four: The Dystopian Classic by George Orwell

Will you not agree with me if I say, in literature dystopia means ‘Nineteen Eighty-Four’ by George Orwell? This dark, nightmarish world painted by Orwell coined words for us to remember for a lifetime – ‘big brother’, ‘the all seeing eye’, ‘thought police’, etc. At first, I was amazed how someone could foresee forty-years ahead … Continue reading Nineteen Eighty-Four: The Dystopian Classic by George Orwell

The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway: Book Summary

‘The Old Man and the Sea’ by Ernest Hemingway is about Santiago, the old man and the three days and three nights that he spends at the sea, all by himself and his marvelous catch – the marlin fish. The ‘Old Man’ from the title is Santiago and Hemingway addresses him this way throughout the … Continue reading The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway: Book Summary

The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka: Book Review

What if, one morning you woke up and found yourself turned into a bug? Maybe, in the fantasy world, you would think of acquiring the superpowers of Spiderman, Antman, and the likes. On a tragic note, you would realize the disastrous consequences awaiting your life. The Metamorphosis is a novella written by Franz Kafka that … Continue reading The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka: Book Review

The Odyssey by Homer: Book Review

For the one who has not read ‘Illiad’, ‘The Odyssey’ may set you on course an unchartered territory. ‘The Odyssey’ is the world of ancient Greek mythology where humans, Gods, and monsters cohabit magical islands and kingdoms. At the heart of it, is the chivalry and valour of one man – Ulysses. It is said … Continue reading The Odyssey by Homer: Book Review