Reading ‘Lincoln in the Bardo’ by George Saunders the Second Time

I had read Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders overcome by the hubbub of it winning the Booker Prize in 2017. Back then, I felt sour about spending a hefty amount over a book that wasn’t historical fiction in the true sense though it promised to be about Abraham Lincoln and his deceased son.… Continue reading Reading ‘Lincoln in the Bardo’ by George Saunders the Second Time

Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Albom | Book Review

I came to ‘Tuesdays with Morrie’ by Mitch Albom when I was searching for a book with deeper philosophical connotations. This autobiographical book based on Mitch Albom’s visits to his terminally ill Professor has been popular in the self-help genre since its publication in 1997. But I was yet to read! On the cover, just… Continue reading Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Albom | Book Review

The Sense of an Ending by Julian Barnes | Book Review

I read ‘The Sense of an Ending’ by Julian Barnes soon after it had won the Man Booker Prize in 2011. Once I received the book, the most striking part was its minimal cover design. Though I was clueless on what to expect from a book that merely ran into 150 pages!  Least to say,… Continue reading The Sense of an Ending by Julian Barnes | Book Review

Death on the Nile by Agatha Christie | Book Review

Death on the Nile by Agatha Christie, Harper Collins Publishers, 373 pages Nostalgia is what brings me to Agatha Christie books. I wanted to read ‘Death on the Nile’ for the sheer joy of revisiting Christie’s style of detective fiction writing. ‘Death on the Nile’ is the 17th book in the Hercule Poirot series, originally… Continue reading Death on the Nile by Agatha Christie | Book Review

Moustache by S. Hareesh: The winner of the JCB Prize for Literature 2020

A modern fable traversing the length and breadth of the below-sea-level farming areas of Kerala, set about a hundred years ago resurrecting forgotten stories, myths, and legends within the realm of magical realism. Undoubtedly, ‘Moustache’ was the most awaited read for me, especially after it won the JCB Prize for Literature 2020. ‘Moustache’ is written… Continue reading Moustache by S. Hareesh: The winner of the JCB Prize for Literature 2020

The Enchanted April by Elizabeth Von Arnim: To Those Who Appreciate Wisteria and Sunshine

“I daresay when we finally reach heaven – the one they talk about so much – we shan’t find it a bit more beautiful.” Enchanted is the word! Yes, while reading ‘The Enchanted April’ by Elizabeth Von Arnim published in 1922, I was in San Salvatore, vicariously living in a castle and basking in the… Continue reading The Enchanted April by Elizabeth Von Arnim: To Those Who Appreciate Wisteria and Sunshine

Kintsugi by Anukrti Upadhyay: A tale of Japanese art, an Indian craft and three resilient women

‘Kintsugi’ is mystifying as a title for a work of Indian fiction. This word comes from the Japanese art of repairing broken pottery by using lacquer containing powdered gold, silver, or other metals. At a deeper philosophical level, ‘Kintsugi’ is about appreciating beauty in imperfections by highlighting the breakage instead of concealing it.  Anukrti Upadhyay… Continue reading Kintsugi by Anukrti Upadhyay: A tale of Japanese art, an Indian craft and three resilient women

The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood | Book Review

Dystopia in ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ is much harder to read than the one in ‘1984’ by George Orwell. As a female reader, the thrust of ‘dystopia’ cascades over to the women in this book. Frankly, ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ haunts you like no other horror. I kept asking myself after every chapter, if this was a… Continue reading The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood | Book Review

The Unbearable Lightness of Being by Milan Kundera: Soul versus Body or Art versus Kitsch

I had scribbled a few lines from ‘The Unbearable Lightness of Being’ onto my journal…this was fifteen years back! About a year ago, in one of the book club meetings, a young college girl asked me if I read this book. My answer being ‘No’, there was an honest enthusiastic recommendation from her end. And,… Continue reading The Unbearable Lightness of Being by Milan Kundera: Soul versus Body or Art versus Kitsch

Agnes Grey by Anne Bronte | Book Review

Reading ‘Agnes Grey’ brought with it the memories of reading ‘Jane Eyre’. And, it is an irony that ‘Agnes Grey’ was written a year before ‘Jane Eyre’; though published around the same time in the year 1847, the latter became a more popular Classic. Perhaps the Cinderella twist in ‘Jane Eyre’, Mr.Rochester riding on a… Continue reading Agnes Grey by Anne Bronte | Book Review

Burmese Days by George Orwell: Book Review

‘Burmese Days’ by George Orwell is a window into the lives of the British Officials serving in Burma under the British occupation of the Indian sub-continent. Orwell could draw a lot from the five-years he spent as a police officer in the Indian Imperial Police force in Burma. Katha on the west side of the… Continue reading Burmese Days by George Orwell: Book Review

Hard Times by Charles Dickens: If ‘Facts Alone Are Wanted in Life…’?

‘Hard Times’ was a satirical take on the existing educational system and the impact of growing industrialization. It is an irony, indeed, that our modern world continues to adhere to the notions criticized by Charles Dickens through his book in 1854. Like in every Dickensian realm, in this book too, the characters are divided into… Continue reading Hard Times by Charles Dickens: If ‘Facts Alone Are Wanted in Life…’?

If on a Winter’s Night a Traveller by Italo Calvino: Book Review

A remarkable maze to get this book…is the book! ‘A Romance of the Reader’ said the headline of the review on ‘If on a Winter’s Night a Traveller’ published in the New York Times in 1981. What better than this headline to summarise this amazing book!  ‘If on a Winter’s Night a Traveller’ is a… Continue reading If on a Winter’s Night a Traveller by Italo Calvino: Book Review

Let the Willows Weep by Sherry Parnell: Book Review

I received the ARC of this book in exchange of an honest review. And, I was immediately drawn to the title besides this beautiful cover of ‘Let the Willows Weep’ by Sherry Parnell. As the title suggests, I braced myself for an emotional, tragic story. It definitely has elements of an emotional story but with… Continue reading Let the Willows Weep by Sherry Parnell: Book Review

The Road to Delano by John DeSimone: A compelling historical fiction and thriller

‘The Road to Delano’ is a historical fiction and thriller written by John DeSimone. The story is about Jack Duncan as he unearths the mysterious death of his father during the Californian grape strike. The beauty of the story is that the author takes us to the countryside in America and sets the plot in… Continue reading The Road to Delano by John DeSimone: A compelling historical fiction and thriller

Irrationally Passionate: My Turnaround from Rebel to Entrepreneur by Jason Kothari – Book Review

‘Irrationally Passionate’ is a young, successful entrepreneur’s story of making it big, treading an unconventional path. This entrepreneur is Jason Kothari, with an impressive resume to make you delve right into the book. One look at the cover and you realize this isn’t going to be a philosophical sermon on entrepreneurship or how to become… Continue reading Irrationally Passionate: My Turnaround from Rebel to Entrepreneur by Jason Kothari – Book Review

Ravyn by TL Fisher: Review of the New Release

Ravyn is the latest book by TL Fisher which came out on 20th January. Ravyn is a superbly written book, highlighting domestic abuse and how it affects the victim. Even though the book and the characters are set in modern-day America, I am sure the subject is more pertinent to the Indian context. Fisher’s protagonist… Continue reading Ravyn by TL Fisher: Review of the New Release

Forrest Gump: Comparing the book and its movie adaptation

I could never quite get myself to watch ‘Forrest Gump’ but when I did; I had to write about it. Once, I was on YouTube and saw this episode featuring Tom Hanks and Meryl Streep on Ellen’s show where Tom Hanks enacts the famous line ‘Life is a box of chocolates’. The next thing I… Continue reading Forrest Gump: Comparing the book and its movie adaptation

The Gingerbread Star by Anne Fine: Children’s Book Review

A little grey worm's wish to be a glow worm is sure to steal your heart. The super cute illustrations and the fun text is simply enticing for 4 to 5 year old children! I stumbled upon ‘The Gingerbread Star’ by Anne Fine in the children’s section of a bookstore and was immediately impressed by… Continue reading The Gingerbread Star by Anne Fine: Children’s Book Review

The Curse of Nader Shah – Rise and Fall of a Tyrant by Sutapa Basu

Sutapa Basu weaves a historical fiction around Nader Shah, one of the most powerful Persian rulers and his endeavors in conquering a vast expanse of the world. Nader Shah was not a Mughal but a man who conquered the Mughal Empire bringing the ‘Peacock throne’ and ‘Koh-i-Noor’ diamond to Persia. He was a man who… Continue reading The Curse of Nader Shah – Rise and Fall of a Tyrant by Sutapa Basu