The Bronte Sisters | On their writing and books

Charlotte Bronte wrote in ‘Jane Eyre’, “I am no bird; and no net ensnares me: I am a free human being with an independent will.” The Bronte sisters had a unique point of view on class and gender. These three sisters shaped their writings based on their life experiences and created one of the most … Continue reading The Bronte Sisters | On their writing and books

Five Amazing Places in Dan Brown’s ‘Origin’

‘Origin’ was a much-anticipated read for me. I am unabashedly a big Dan Brown fan owing to the memories of reading ‘Da Vinci Code’ and ‘Angels and Demons’. Though the book I read before ‘Origin’ was a bit of a dampener, ‘The Lost Symbol’ compared to the previous two books. Even so, I looked forward … Continue reading Five Amazing Places in Dan Brown’s ‘Origin’

Little Women by Louisa May Alcott | Book Review

I'd been procrastinating way too much on this one, that is until I saw the movie trailer of ‘Little Women’, the onscreen adaptation by Greta Gerwig! Instantly, I jumped in, read the book, saw the movie, and loved both! Coming to the book, ‘Little Women’ is like a fable for adult readers. The story follows … Continue reading Little Women by Louisa May Alcott | Book Review

Poetry as a Healing Therapy

I have been writing about books and their therapeutic impact through a blog post every month since January 2020 under the ‘Bibliotherapy series #CauseAChatter’. (If you wish, you can read the previous posts here.) Today’s post is ‘Poetry as a Healing Therapy’. ‘Bibliotherapy’ essentially believes that books or literature help to heal. Reading great books, … Continue reading Poetry as a Healing Therapy

Five YA Book to Movie Adaptations

I wanted to write about my dreaded ‘Did Not Finish’ list and then I realized that it was a synonym for the YA books on my shelf. Obviously, the question propped up inside my head - Am I too old to read YA books? Seriously, I tend to miserably slacken while reading a YA book … Continue reading Five YA Book to Movie Adaptations

The Penelopiad and Circe: Two Retellings of Homer’s ‘The Odyssey’

‘The Penelopiad’ by Margaret Atwood and ‘Circe’ by Madeline Miller changed the narrative set by Homer’s ‘The Odyssey’ ‘Sing to me of the man, Muse, the man of twists and turns driven time and again off course, once he had plundered the hallowed heights of Troy.’ – The Odyssey by Homer ‘The Odyssey’ by Homer … Continue reading The Penelopiad and Circe: Two Retellings of Homer’s ‘The Odyssey’

Books Read by Fictional Characters

You read a book and the fictional character in your book reads a book too! Don’t you love it when this happens… It is exciting to find fictional characters relishing a book or just a small plot of some book or getting inspired by another book.   Another charm in knowing a fictional character’s love … Continue reading Books Read by Fictional Characters

Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell | Book Recommendation

“Food! Food! Why did the stomach have a longer memory than the mind?” War isn’t poetic or romantic, not even in literature. ‘Gone With the Wind’ by Margaret Mitchell makes such a compelling read in its realistic portrayal of the American Civil War period. ‘Gone With the Wind’ had been on my TBR for a … Continue reading Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell | Book Recommendation

Three of My Favourite Agatha Christie Books

Reading ‘Agatha Christie’ makes one nostalgic. I wonder how an old-fashioned crime investigation can hold its charm for a 100-years now! Agatha Christie published her first book, ‘The Mysterious Affair at Styles’ in 1920 and introduced Hercule Poirot, the detective who appeared in thirty-three of her sixty-six detective novels. Sherlock Holmes (created by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle) … Continue reading Three of My Favourite Agatha Christie Books

The Enchanted April by Elizabeth Von Arnim | To Those Who Appreciate Wisteria and Sunshine

“I daresay when we finally reach heaven – the one they talk about so much – we shan’t find it a bit more beautiful.” Enchanted is the word! Yes, while reading ‘The Enchanted April’ by Elizabeth Von Arnim published in 1922, I was in San Salvatore, vicariously living in a castle and basking in the … Continue reading The Enchanted April by Elizabeth Von Arnim | To Those Who Appreciate Wisteria and Sunshine

Reading with Your Child: Bibliotherapy #CauseAChatter

We live in a devastatingly stressed-out world. Irrespective of the fact when we lived in the pre-pandemic phase of non-stop work, travel, meetings, and functions or the present ‘new normal’ of buying groceries, managing household chores, and online work. ‘Home’ being the 24x7 destination as of now for all of us. We are running on … Continue reading Reading with Your Child: Bibliotherapy #CauseAChatter

Kintsugi by Anukrti Upadhyay: A tale of Japanese art, an Indian craft and three resilient women

‘Kintsugi’ is mystifying as a title for a work of Indian fiction. This word comes from the Japanese art of repairing broken pottery by using lacquer containing powdered gold, silver, or other metals. At a deeper philosophical level, ‘Kintsugi’ is about appreciating beauty in imperfections by highlighting the breakage instead of concealing it.  Anukrti Upadhyay … Continue reading Kintsugi by Anukrti Upadhyay: A tale of Japanese art, an Indian craft and three resilient women

The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood | Book Review

Dystopia in ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ is way harder to read than the one in ‘1984’ by George Orwell because as a female reader, the thrust of ‘dystopia’ cascades over to the women in this book. Frankly, ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ haunts you like no other horror. I kept asking myself after every chapter, if this was … Continue reading The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood | Book Review

Bibliotherapy: Discussing the Healing Power of these Five Books #CauseAChatter

As a creative arts therapy, ‘Bibliotherapy’ has become widely accepted in treating depression, anxiety, stress, loneliness, and communication issues. Storytelling and reading from a specifically curated booklist help to emotionally heal. Broadly speaking, reading benefits at many levels by increasing self-awareness and improving self-esteem, and thus equipping the individual to face developmental crises. This guided … Continue reading Bibliotherapy: Discussing the Healing Power of these Five Books #CauseAChatter

The Unbearable Lightness of Being by Milan Kundera: Soul versus Body or Art versus Kitsch

I had scribbled a few lines from ‘The Unbearable Lightness of Being’ onto my journal…this was fifteen years back! About a year ago, in one of the book club meetings, a young college girl asked me if I read this book. My answer being ‘No’, there was an honest enthusiastic recommendation from her end. And, … Continue reading The Unbearable Lightness of Being by Milan Kundera: Soul versus Body or Art versus Kitsch

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte: A Classic with an astounding female protagonist

In 1847, Charlotte Bronte published ‘Jane Eyre’ under the pseudonym of Currer Bell. Clearly, this was not the era of female writers but Bronte sisters brought strong female characters outside the purview of matrimony into the literary scenario. In ‘Jane Eyre’, Bronte told the story of a young spirited girl, her hardships, social isolation, and … Continue reading Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte: A Classic with an astounding female protagonist

Bibliotherapy: Turning to books during these distressing times

A cup of tea and a book…what else do we ask of life? This may not be a factual statement. Something, we further realized when books weren’t included in the essential commodities list during the lockdown. Books cannot get you money or fame unless you happen to be a bestseller author, nonetheless, books can definitely … Continue reading Bibliotherapy: Turning to books during these distressing times

Agnes Grey by Anne Bronte | Book Review

Reading ‘Agnes Grey’ brought with it the memories of reading ‘Jane Eyre’. And, it is an irony that ‘Agnes Grey’ was written a year before ‘Jane Eyre’; though published around the same time in the year 1847, the latter became a more popular Classic. Perhaps the Cinderella twist in ‘Jane Eyre’, Mr.Rochester riding on a … Continue reading Agnes Grey by Anne Bronte | Book Review

Sometimes When I’m Sad by Deborah Serani: A Self Help Book for young children

‘Sometimes When I’m Sad’ by Deborah Serani is a handbook on ‘overcoming sadness’ in children. This is a self-help picture book with easy to read text for young children. And, the author supplements the story with the 4-page resource material for parents at the end of the story, educating more on helping children through sadness. … Continue reading Sometimes When I’m Sad by Deborah Serani: A Self Help Book for young children

What’s All the Commotion?: A book about Social Distancing by Jessie Glenn

‘What's All the Commotion?’ is an inclusive picture book about COVID-19 and social distancing that seeks to explain this tough, timely topic to children. The world we live in has terribly changed due to the pandemic in the last few months. We are now calling this the ‘new normal’. As adults, we understand the gravity … Continue reading What’s All the Commotion?: A book about Social Distancing by Jessie Glenn