Hyderabad: The Partition Trilogy, Book II | Book Review

Title: Hyderabad (Book II of The Partition Trilogy)Author: Manreet Sodhi SomeshwarGenre: Historical FictionPublisher: Harper Collins India Blurb Mir Osman Ali Khan, Asaf Jah VII, the Nizam of Hyderabad, the largest Princely State of the Crown. It sits in the belly of newly independent India to which Jawaharlal Nehru and Vallabhbhai Patel want Hyderabad to accede. The … Continue reading Hyderabad: The Partition Trilogy, Book II | Book Review

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Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier

‘Rebecca’ by Daphne du Maurier is exceptional, so much so that when you reach the last line, you will go back to the first chapter to see the magic unravel!  Undoubtedly, ‘Rebecca’ has a ghost-like undertone to it, yet it is so real that you marvel at Daphne du Maurier’s story-telling technique. (The last story … Continue reading Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier

The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris | Book Review

‘The Tattooist of Auschwitz’ by Heather Morris is a moving tale of love, despair, and survival set during WW II. The book became a bestseller since its publication in 2018.  We have read and watched documentaries based on the horrors of the holocaust and the barbarity of the Nazis inside the concentration camps. Building on … Continue reading The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris | Book Review

Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro | Book Review

There is dystopia and then there is ‘Never Let Me Go’ by Kazuo Ishiguro. This book categorized as dystopian science fiction was published in 2005 and was shortlisted for the Booker Prize. That’s quite a burden to hold, plus a star-studded movie based on the book. I had read ‘Klara and the Sun’ by Ishiguro … Continue reading Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro | Book Review

Rising: 30 Women Who Changed India by Kiran Manral

‘Rising: 30 Women Who Changed India’ by Kiran Manral tells the stories of 30 successful women from various facets of public life, be it politics, governance, cinema, performing arts, business, sports, writing, scientific arena, or royalty. Indeed, the book is an inspirational compilation of 30 stories, more specifically 30 personalities who define women empowerment and … Continue reading Rising: 30 Women Who Changed India by Kiran Manral

The Help by Kathyrn Stockett | Book Review

I remember watching 'The Help' starring Viola Davis, Octavia Spencer, and Emma Stone years back. In the end credits, it said the story is based on a book. Usually, I would have read the book before watching the movie, but this was the other way around. So, a couple of years back when I saw … Continue reading The Help by Kathyrn Stockett | Book Review

The Notebook by Nicholas Sparks | Book Review

I decided to take a break from all the heavy-weight Classic Romances from my reading list and turn to something more YA-ish romance novel of the 90s. 'The Notebook' is a simple read, oozing of the mush with a certain depth and perspective on love. We begin with an old man reading from his journal, … Continue reading The Notebook by Nicholas Sparks | Book Review

#TataStories: 40 Timeless Tales to Inspire You by Harish Bhat | Book Review

Who isn’t entranced by the Tata legacy? A business conglomerate that started in the pre-independence era and stayed relevant, made an indelible mark on the citizens of this country and contributed to its development trajectory. ‘#Tatastories - 40 Timeless Tales to Inspire You’ by Harish Bhat is an intriguing and intuitive peek into this establishment … Continue reading #TataStories: 40 Timeless Tales to Inspire You by Harish Bhat | Book Review

A Suitable Boy by Vikram Seth | Book Review

‘A Suitable Boy’ by Vikram Seth stayed on my bookshelf for the longest, of course owing to its intimidating length. But the hype about this book in the literary circles and amongst a group of book lovers always made me curious about what am I missing out on! And the Netflix series only resurrected whatever … Continue reading A Suitable Boy by Vikram Seth | Book Review

Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders | Book Review

I had read Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders overcome by the hubbub of its winning the Booker Prize in 2017. Back then, I felt sour about spending a hefty amount on a book that wasn’t historical fiction in the true sense though it promised to be about Abraham Lincoln and his deceased son. … Continue reading Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders | Book Review

Embrace Your Inner Child With ‘The Little Prince’ by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

I think I lived under a Baobab tree to keep pushing aside ‘The Little Prince’ by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, reasoning over its melancholic undertone. Though ironically it is a Children’s book. ‘The Little Prince’ reads like a parable. There is fantasy and realism that declutters many of our modern-day self-delusions. ‘The Little Prince’ begins with … Continue reading Embrace Your Inner Child With ‘The Little Prince’ by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Albom | Book Review

I came to ‘Tuesdays with Morrie’ by Mitch Albom when I was searching for a book with deeper philosophical connotations. This autobiographical book based on Mitch Albom’s visits to his terminally ill Professor has been popular in the self-help genre since its publication in 1997. But I was yet to read! On the cover, just … Continue reading Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Albom | Book Review

The Sun is Also A Star by Nicola Yoon | Book Review

‘The Sun is Also a Star’ by Nicole Yoon is a heartwarming, idyllic, and fairytale-ish read. In my opinion, this book is a delightful amalgamation of YA meets immigrant and romance themes. The story begins the day Natasha Kingsley, the 16-year-old good-looking, head turner Jamaican-American is set to be deported from America to her home … Continue reading The Sun is Also A Star by Nicola Yoon | Book Review

China Room by Sunjeev Sahota: Book Review

China Room by Sunjeev Sahota, Penguin Random House India, 243 pages China Room: An intuitive story on patriarchy, love, and despair intertwined with alienation, isolation, and addiction of a young immigrant. Deservedly, Longlisted for the 2021 Booker Prize. ‘China Room’ by Sunjeev Sahota is an intrinsically Indian story; it takes you back in time to … Continue reading China Room by Sunjeev Sahota: Book Review

The Teachings of Bhagavad Gita: Timeless Wisdom for the Modern Age by Richa Tilokani | Book Review

The Teaching of Bhagavad Gita by Richa Tilokani, Hay House, 226 pages ‘Bhagavad Gita’ is the epitome of knowledge, a philosophical discourse leading one onto the path of spiritual awakening. ‘The Teachings of Bhagavad Gita: Timeless Wisdom for the Modern Age’ by Richa Tilokani presents a simple, contemporized, and easy-to-understand interpretation of ‘Bhagavad Gita’. In … Continue reading The Teachings of Bhagavad Gita: Timeless Wisdom for the Modern Age by Richa Tilokani | Book Review

Half of a Yellow Sun by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie: Book Review

I heard Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s ‘The Danger of a Single Story’ Ted Talk a couple of years back. It made me think about the political and media influence on structuring a story that leads to a one-sided prejudiced opinion in our minds. “I am Nigerian because a white man created Nigeria and gave me that … Continue reading Half of a Yellow Sun by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie: Book Review

Is ‘Wind in the Willows’ by Kenneth Grahame interesting to read as an adult?

I opened ‘The Wind in the Willows’ by Kenneth Grahame with the expectation of reading an idyllic children’s book. Perhaps I was being a bit too literal in my headspace. ‘The Wind in the Willows’ indeed has more appeal for an adult mind than a child’s, the one that has seen the realities of life.  … Continue reading Is ‘Wind in the Willows’ by Kenneth Grahame interesting to read as an adult?

The Sense of an Ending by Julian Barnes | Book Review

I read ‘The Sense of an Ending’ by Julian Barnes soon after it had won the Man Booker Prize in 2011. Once I received the book, the most striking part was its minimal cover design. Though I was clueless on what to expect from a book that merely ran into 150 pages!  Least to say, … Continue reading The Sense of an Ending by Julian Barnes | Book Review

Five Takeaways from Ikigai: The Japanese Secret to a Long and Happy Life by Héctor García and Francesc Miralles

I wonder why it took me four long years to reach ‘Ikigai: The Japanese Secret to a Long and Happy Life’ by Héctor García and Francesc Miralles. The book happened to me amidst the Covid-19 times, and instead of the paperback, I had the audiobook. My first ever audiobook experience! When I started listening to … Continue reading Five Takeaways from Ikigai: The Japanese Secret to a Long and Happy Life by Héctor García and Francesc Miralles

The Testaments by Margaret Atwood | Book Review

As I held the copy of ‘The Testaments’ by Margaret Atwood, I was elated to think I am holding on to the most awaited sequel of a modern classic. ‘The Testaments’ was also the joint winner of the 2019 Man Booker Prize. However, the negative reviews were a bit dampening. Anyhow, I went ahead with … Continue reading The Testaments by Margaret Atwood | Book Review