Embrace Your Inner Child With ‘The Little Prince’ by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

I think I lived under a Baobab tree to keep pushing aside ‘The Little Prince’ by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, reasoning over its melancholic undertone. Though ironically it is a Children’s book. ‘The Little Prince’ reads like a parable. There is fantasy and realism that declutters many of our modern-day self-delusions. ‘The Little Prince’ begins with … Continue reading Embrace Your Inner Child With ‘The Little Prince’ by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Albom | Book Review

I came to ‘Tuesdays with Morrie’ by Mitch Albom when I was searching for a book with deeper philosophical connotations. This autobiographical book based on Mitch Albom’s visits to his terminally ill Professor has been popular in the self-help genre since its publication in 1997. But I was yet to read! On the cover, just … Continue reading Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Albom | Book Review

The Sun is Also A Star by Nicola Yoon | Book Review

‘The Sun is Also a Star’ by Nicole Yoon is a heartwarming, idyllic, and fairytale-ish read. In my opinion, this book is a delightful amalgamation of YA meets immigrant and romance themes. The story begins the day Natasha Kingsley, the 16-year-old good-looking, head turner Jamaican-American is set to be deported from America to her home … Continue reading The Sun is Also A Star by Nicola Yoon | Book Review

China Room by Sunjeev Sahota: Book Review

China Room by Sunjeev Sahota, Penguin Random House India, 243 pages China Room: An intuitive story on patriarchy, love, and despair intertwined with alienation, isolation, and addiction of a young immigrant. Deservedly, Longlisted for the 2021 Booker Prize. ‘China Room’ by Sunjeev Sahota is an intrinsically Indian story; it takes you back in time to … Continue reading China Room by Sunjeev Sahota: Book Review

The Teachings of Bhagavad Gita: Timeless Wisdom for the Modern Age by Richa Tilokani | Book Review

The Teaching of Bhagavad Gita by Richa Tilokani, Hay House, 226 pages ‘Bhagavad Gita’ is the epitome of knowledge, a philosophical discourse leading one onto the path of spiritual awakening. ‘The Teachings of Bhagavad Gita: Timeless Wisdom for the Modern Age’ by Richa Tilokani presents a simple, contemporized, and easy-to-understand interpretation of ‘Bhagavad Gita’. In … Continue reading The Teachings of Bhagavad Gita: Timeless Wisdom for the Modern Age by Richa Tilokani | Book Review

Half of a Yellow Sun by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie: Book Review

I heard Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s ‘The Danger of a Single Story’ Ted Talk a couple of years back. It made me think about the political and media influence on structuring a story that leads to a one-sided prejudiced opinion in our minds. “I am Nigerian because a white man created Nigeria and gave me that … Continue reading Half of a Yellow Sun by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie: Book Review

Is ‘Wind in the Willows’ by Kenneth Grahame interesting to read as an adult?

I opened ‘The Wind in the Willows’ by Kenneth Grahame with the expectation of reading an idyllic children’s book. Perhaps I was being a bit too literal in my headspace. ‘The Wind in the Willows’ indeed has more appeal for an adult mind than a child’s, the one that has seen the realities of life.  … Continue reading Is ‘Wind in the Willows’ by Kenneth Grahame interesting to read as an adult?

The Sense of an Ending by Julian Barnes: Book Review

I read ‘The Sense of an Ending’ by Julian Barnes soon after it had won the Man Booker Prize in 2011. Once I received the book, the most striking part was its minimal cover design. Though I was clueless on what to expect from a book that merely ran into 150 pages!  Least to say, … Continue reading The Sense of an Ending by Julian Barnes: Book Review

Five Takeaways from Ikigai: The Japanese Secret to a Long and Happy Life by Héctor García and Francesc Miralles

I wonder why it took me four long years to reach ‘Ikigai: The Japanese Secret to a Long and Happy Life’ by Héctor García and Francesc Miralles. The book happened to me amidst the Covid-19 times, and instead of the paperback, I had the audiobook. My first ever audiobook experience! When I started listening to … Continue reading Five Takeaways from Ikigai: The Japanese Secret to a Long and Happy Life by Héctor García and Francesc Miralles

The Testaments by Margaret Atwood: Book Review

As I held the copy of ‘The Testaments’ by Margaret Atwood, I was elated to think I am holding on to the most awaited sequel of a modern classic. ‘The Testaments’ was also the joint winner of the 2019 Man Booker Prize. However, the negative reviews were a bit dampening. Anyhow, I went ahead with … Continue reading The Testaments by Margaret Atwood: Book Review

Death on the Nile by Agatha Christie: Book Review

Death on the Nile by Agatha Christie, Harper Collins Publishers, 373 pages Nostalgia is what brings me to Agatha Christie books. I wanted to read ‘Death on the Nile’ for the sheer joy of revisiting Christie’s style of detective fiction writing. ‘Death on the Nile’ is the 17th book in the Hercule Poirot series, originally … Continue reading Death on the Nile by Agatha Christie: Book Review

Moustache by S. Hareesh: The winner of the JCB Prize for Literature 2020

A modern fable traversing the length and breadth of the below-sea-level farming areas of Kerala, set about a hundred years ago resurrecting forgotten stories, myths, and legends within the realm of magical realism. Undoubtedly, ‘Moustache’ was the most awaited read for me, especially after it won the JCB Prize for Literature 2020. ‘Moustache’ is written … Continue reading Moustache by S. Hareesh: The winner of the JCB Prize for Literature 2020

The Mathematical Investigations of Dr. O and Arya by Arya Okten and Giray Okten

As a child, I remember being terrified of Mathematics. As I got promoted each year in school, the numbers got bigger and became even scarier. When I received the ARC of ‘The Mathematical Investigations of Dr. O and Arya’ from Prof Giray Okten, I was more than glad to review this book. ‘The Mathematical Investigations … Continue reading The Mathematical Investigations of Dr. O and Arya by Arya Okten and Giray Okten

Five Must-Read Short Stories by Rabindranath Tagore

Rabindranath Tagore’s short stories are a perfect depiction of Indian society, set in the time of British rule. Of course, he typically kept the plot and storyline confined within the geographical and cultural boundary of Bengal. But, what cuts across the cultural reference is the emotions of women in each of his short stories. His … Continue reading Five Must-Read Short Stories by Rabindranath Tagore

Bronte Sisters: Their Books and Writings

Charlotte Bronte wrote in ‘Jane Eyre’, “I am no bird; and no net ensnares me: I am a free human being with an independent will.” The Bronte sisters had a unique point of view on class and gender. These three sisters shaped their writings based on their life experiences and created one of the most … Continue reading Bronte Sisters: Their Books and Writings

Five Amazing Places in Dan Brown’s ‘Origin’

‘Origin’ was a much-anticipated read for me. I am unabashedly a big Dan Brown fan owing to the memories of reading ‘Da Vinci Code’ and ‘Angels and Demons’. Though the book I read before ‘Origin’ was a bit of a dampener, ‘The Lost Symbol’ compared to the previous two books. Even so, I looked forward … Continue reading Five Amazing Places in Dan Brown’s ‘Origin’

Little Women by Louisa May Alcott: Book Review

I had been procrastinating the decision to read this book for a very long time…that is until I saw the movie trailer of ‘Little Women’, the book adaptation by Greta Gerwig! I jumped in, read the book, saw the movie, and loved both! Coming to the book, ‘Little Women’ is like a fable for adult … Continue reading Little Women by Louisa May Alcott: Book Review

The Penelopiad and Circe: Two Retellings of Homer’s ‘The Odyssey’

‘The Penelopiad’ by Margaret Atwood and ‘Circe’ by Madeline Miller changed the narrative set by Homer’s ‘The Odyssey’ ‘Sing to me of the man, Muse, the man of twists and turns driven time and again off course, once he had plundered the hallowed heights of Troy.’ – The Odyssey by Homer ‘The Odyssey’ by Homer … Continue reading The Penelopiad and Circe: Two Retellings of Homer’s ‘The Odyssey’

Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell: One of the best Classic books I’ve ever read

“Food! Food! Why did the stomach have a longer memory than the mind?” War isn’t poetic or romantic, not even in literature. ‘Gone With the Wind’ by Margaret Mitchell makes such a compelling read in its realistic portrayal of the American Civil War period. ‘Gone With the Wind’ had been on my TBR for a … Continue reading Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell: One of the best Classic books I’ve ever read

Three of My Favourite Agatha Christie Books

Reading ‘Agatha Christie’ makes one nostalgic. I wonder how an old-fashioned crime investigation can hold its charm for a 100-years now! Agatha Christie published her first book, ‘The Mysterious Affair at Styles’ in 1920 and introduced Hercule Poirot, the detective who appeared in thirty-three of her sixty-six detective novels. Sherlock Holmes (created by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle) … Continue reading Three of My Favourite Agatha Christie Books